The Tree by John Fowles

“The first trees I knew well were the apples and pears in the garden of my childhood home. This may sound rural and bucolic, but it was not, for the house was a semi-detached in a 1920s suburb at the mouth of the Thames, some forty miles from London.” John Fowles

The writing life of John Fowles was dominated by trees. From the orchards of his childhood in suburban Essex to the woodlands of wartime-Devon, trees filled his imagination and enriched his many best selling and acclaimed novels. Told through his lifelong relationship with trees, blending autobiography, literary criticism, philosophy and nature writing, John Fowles’ The Tree is a masterly, powerful work that laid the literary foundations for nature-as-memoir, a genre that has seen recent flourishings in Roger Deakin’s Wildwood, Richard Mabey’s Nature Cure, Robert Macfarlane’s The Old Ways and Helen Macdonald’s H is for Hawk.

Read William Fiennes’s foreword

Hardback | 225mm x 150mm |  102 pages

Jacket artwork and illustrations throughout by Ed Kluz

 

 

 

 

 

 

SKU: TREE

£12.00

In stock

John Fowles (1926-2005) won international recognition with his first published title, The Collector  (1963). He was immediately acclaimed as an outstandingly innovative writer of exceptional imaginative power and this reputation was confirmed with the appearance of his subsequent works: The Aristos  (1964), The Magus  (1966), The French Lieutenant’s Woman  (1969), The Ebony Tower (1974), Daniel Martin  (1977), Mantissa  (1982), and A Maggot  (1985). The French Lieutenant’s Woman became a major film in 1981, starring Jeremy Irons and Meryl Streep, with a screenplay by Harold Pinter. Fowles was named by The Times as one of the fifty greatest British writers since the end of the Second World War. He lived for much of his life in the Dorset town of Lyme Regis, taking much of his literary inspiration from the location. He died in 2005.